Thursday, October 8, 2015

Pharmacy Hack: Immunization Band Aid Hack

#Pharmacy #Pharmacist Hack

Here's an idea which makes it a lot easier dealing with flu shots and band aids this time of year.

Have band aids ready with one side of the band aid uncovered and ready to stick.

Ask patient to hold up their loosely-fitting, short sleeve shirt. (It never hurts to hope, right?)

Swab the patient's arm where you're going to administer the shot.

Place the band aid half-way on as shown. This helps you remember where you're going to give the shot when you look away to grab the syringe.

Administer shot. 



(Please note that is is a demonstration only... and I'm not wearing gloves. I know you're supposed to wear gloves.)

By the way, I've found that people appreciate it if you don't just jab it in quickly. That hurts more than if you just insert the needle slowly. It also seems to help if you squeeze the arm where you're giving the shot. Maybe it doesn't really matter, but people come back to see me for shots much more than they see my pharmacy partner Mickey the jabber.

Toss syringe into Sharp's container. Flip the rest of the band aid over. Presto! You're done!

LINK

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I just swab the area and leave the swab stuck to the area I want to stick with the corner marking my spot. I never give out bandaids unless the patient asks.

Anonymous said...

you have nice fingers. clean.

Anonymous said...

We don't swab, use band-aids or wear gloves. Is there any evidence that swabbing does anything but make bacteria soup?

Anonymous said...

Eh, the faster the better - and don't forget to tell a bad joke. Speed and distraction make for a less distressing injection. Notes from the needle nurse!

Anonymous said...

My trick is to swab first, get your injection ready so the alcohol dries, move their arm back and forth at the elbow like a chicken flapping their wings (it relaxes the deltoid), then give the injection. I'm the most asked for pharmacist for injections at our pharmacy. Cheers to putting the patient first!